Tag Archives: blues

SFS | 5 mins with Milly Tabak

The Miltones front-woman Milly Tabak took a break from writing her bluesy folk-rock ballads to chat with us about her band’s upcoming summer festival debut at WOMAD. You can also find them this summer at MarchFest in Nelson.

 

 

Describe your perfect summer music festival in three words

Mud, friends, dancing

Name the top three artists who would make up your ideal festival line-up

The Guess Who, Fleetwood Mac and Janis Joplin

What are you looking forward to most about playing the summer festival circuit?

Showcasing some of the new music we’ve been working on. I locked myself away this summer to write about some stuff I’ve been going through and it’s finally at the stage where I can share it with everyone!

In your opinion, what’s this year’s Summer Anthem?

All the Young Girls Love Alice – Elton John, always.

Out of all your tunes, which one is the one that ‘never fails’?

Gypsy Queen is always a crowd favourite.

What’s are the top 3 tracks on your Spotify playlist?

Nothings Wrong – Haim
Depths – Yumi Zouma
Outstanding – The Gap Band

What’s your personal ‘guilty pleasure’ track

I have sooo many!
That Don’t Impress Me Much – Shania Twain
Ignition – R. Kelly
Ride Wit Me – Nelly

What’s your social media of choice?

Instagram – I’m constantly deleting it off my phone so it doesn’t take over my life. I’m addicted to #cakeporn.

Who do you follow and where?

Anika Moa on Instagram because she’s a funny bitch! I even followed her all the way to America last month to attend the International Folk Alliance in Kansas and she had me in tears the entire time.

What’s your go-to festival outfit?

Anything by the amazing Brook Tyson. Her creations make me feel like a goddess! She’s actually just finished two new pieces for me to rock on stage at WOMAD!

Word association:

  • Music – Life
  • Festival – Dancing
  • Camping – New Years
  • Fashion –  @brooketysonnz
  • Roadie – Singing

Returning for it’s 14th year at the stunning TSB Bowl of Brooklands and Brooklands Park in New Plymouth, WOMAD New Zealand is a celebration of music, arts and dance from around the globe. Buy your tickets here.

been | Leon Bridges and the Texas Gentlemen – St. James Theatre

If you haven’t heard of Mr Bridges, you’re going to. The 26 year old Texan has been rapidly gaining attention since the release of his debut album, Coming Home, in June last year – and for good reason. ‘The kid,’ as backup singer Brittni Jessie calls him, is not just extremely talented, but refreshingly unique.

Blending raw soul and gospel with doo-wop and urban blues, Bridges’ sound takes you back to a time when music was about just that – music. With a nod to the great African American musicians of the fifties, sixties and seventies, Bridges’ style remains consistently ‘oldschool.’ Each number invokes a sort of nostalgia in the listener, a longing for a different time when things were more authentic. In keeping with the feel of his music, Bridges’ dress and mannerisms herald those of decades past. A single glance at his Instagram confirms this: monochrome photos of Bridges wearing trousers and collared shirts reveal a true dedication to his style and sound.

Ending his world tour in Auckland on January 9th, there’s no surprise that Bridges chose the St James as his venue. The historic building was a perfect match for an artist who has been hailed as a contemporary Sam Cooke or Otis Redding. When they arrived on stage Bridges and his seven-piece band, all immaculately dressed in fine suits, showed the crowd what a real concert should be like. There were no flashy sets, no costume changes and no awe-inspiring light displays. Bridges and The Texas Gentlemen simply played, filling the room with an energy and passion you really needed to be there to understand.

After an introductory song, Bridges proudly announced, in a purposefully Southern accent: “we are from Fort Worth Texas, and we rode in on our horses.” He then proceeded to play the entire Coming Home album, as well as a handful of new numbers. This was a foot-stomping, finger-clicking get-down-and-do-the-twist concert – everywhere you looked, people were dancing. While every song was amazing, there were of course highlights. The upbeat melody Twisting and Grooving, written about Bridges’ grandparents, was an instant mood-setter, as were new songs Let You Down and Mississippi Kisses. Bridges didn’t lose any power by slowing things down, however. The crooning number In My Arms was like something straight out of a 1950s dance party, while the rich, gospel song River was the climax of the show.

Ultimately, Bridges is well-worth going to see. And while he is clearly the star of the show, his band also has to be acknowledged. Without the amazing talents of saxophonist Jeff Dazey, who Bridges professed “has been with me right from the start,” and the flawless backup vocals of Brittni Jesse, the music would have quite a different sound.

A passion for real music is what immediately hits you upon hearing or seeing Leon Bridges and the Texas Gentlemen. Not one to let things go to his head, Bridges waited in the St. James foyer after the concert to take photos with fans and sign posters in an informal meet and greet. Did I meet him? Of course. He was soft-spoken and polite as he signed my poster with a quote from the album’s title song. More than that, he was appreciative. “Nice to meet you man,” he told my boyfriend. “Thank you.” Thank you, Leon, for giving us something to look forward to in the music world.