Category Archives: performing arts

Been | I didn’t Invite You Here To Lecture Me

 

Ding! The class bell rings and we are ushered into the university auditorium.  Today we shall be attending a number of lectures: Law, Shakespeare, German, Music, Political Policy, Linguistics, Literature and Education … it’s a busy day.  Yes, we the audience are once again impressionable and wrought students back in our old lecture hall haunts.

‘I didn’t Invite You Here To Lecture Me’ –  written and produced by Amy Mansfield, has been compiled using endless reams of her own (and surprisingly well-kept) university recitation.  Our orator, played by Mika Austin, masterfully emulates the teaching style of each of the individual lecturers; Seamlessly flitting from one character to the next and then back again, as we are taken on a journey through the complexities of the English vernacular and interweaving each personality through the myriad of lessons.

Given the heady and high-brow subject matter, it will hardly be surprising, that there are opportune moments of student (i.e. audience) participation in this play, but fear not!  For it is all very frivolous and engaging, provoking thought and consciousness.  I myself at times, found myself wistfully reminiscing of university days long gone by …

Mika Austin provides a sublime performance with her shrewd intellect and highly witty script, as well as her lightning-fast personality changes mid-discourse.  Her masterful acting talents are only further demonstrated, by the very timely improvisation she breaks into when one of the classmates (audience) commits a phone faux pas part way through the performance.  The lecturer humorously reminds us of our obligations in the auditorium and immediately falls straight back into stern pontification without missing a beat.

This play will bring back colourful memories for many, from the testing (both literally and figuratively) times of their tertiary years.  It will also have you chuckling away at the tedious nature of a lot of those past tutorials and the seriously comical and character-driven anecdotes from their educators.  A superb performance with talented and flawless delivery.  Be sure to catch it before it heads offshore to the Melbourne Fringe Festival!

I Didn’t Invite You Here To Lecture Me – is now showing @Basement Theatre from the following dates:

Tue, 10 Sep 2019 – Sat, 14 Sep 2019

been | The Blind Date Project

A date so awful to make you appreciate all your tinder dating disasters. 

“Silo’s 2014 sell-out hit returns for a new year and a new you. Five years on, serial dater Anna’s back on the market and looking for love in all the wrong places. Each night, she meets a new blind date, each one played by a different performer, each one a surprise to Anna.”

I walked into the theatre the same way I walk into a bar to meet all my “blind dates” :  open minded, aloof with zero expectations and a hope for some entertainment and a good story to be told over wine. Greeted by the sound of a leather clad bar keep (Yvette Parsons) singing questionable karaoke, I felt an equal dose of intrigue and “what the hell did I just agree to review”.  An 80/20 reaction to most of my actual dates.

Anna (Natalie Medlock) sits at the bar nervously checking her phone waiting for her Tinder date to arrive.  Shortly after her date arrives – who just happens to be pregnant; Anna feigns indifference but this revelation becomes the central talking point of the “blind date”. This 100% improv comedy explores the great human tragedy that is the online dating profile vs the actual flawed reality.

The date becomes increasingly difficult to watch without wincing as their life stories get told and their poorly constructed personas begin to show cracks and unravel at each twist and turn. The phones begin to go off with more frequency. There are times where the audience is kept guessing who will end up making a run for it. Spoiler alert – They don’t. I am watching a train wreck. Like that bad date you know you never want to see again, but are patiently waiting to see how it all turns out. As a woman we have been known to be too polite to just leave when we ought to.

No I’m not leaving a negative review, on the contrary, the performance delivered on it’s premise. And it left me in awe. With a tinge of hope. There really could be someone for “everyone”.

It definitely put me off going on dates.  Oh, who am I kidding….looking down at my phone…”Uber is 2 mins away”….

 

Showing until 30th September. Book your tickets here .

been | We Will Rock You

Thunderbolt and lightning! The NZ Musical Theatre Consortium and Bruce Mason Theatre bring the magnificent musical production ‘We Will Rock You‘ to the stage over the next two months.

Created by the lords of rock ‘Queen’, not to mention the genius of ever-evolving writer, Ben Elton –  this West End musical comes to our shores, with the help of an outstanding cast of actors, ensemble and exceptionally talented band.

With an auditorium packed literally, like sardines, the draw and excitement that enveloped the filled-out crowd was almost tangible.  The audience are immediately drawn in to this musical odyssey with flashing projection of words and visuals to set the scene, and to provide a narrative that is reminiscent of the sci-fi classic ‘Star Wars’, with a somewhat post-apocalyptic feel ….

The orchestra (or band) are also projected above the imposing stage.  An element of this stage setting, that I found both impressive and artistically effective.   A chorus of dancers with costumes emblazoned with the song title “Radio GaGa’ were visually striking and immediately piqued my attention as they set the pace for the rest of the show, as did the eponymous ballad  ‘We Will Rock You’, welcoming us to a musical anthology  full of historical humour, that we were set to enjoy for the remainder of the performance.

We Will Rock You is full of hilarious rock-references and clever dialogue that reflects the glory of a by-gone era of music.   With futuristic themes and cleverly placed classic Queen ballads throughout.  One most noteworthy track being ‘Killer Queen’ which sets the stage for  NZ’s own musical royal, Annie Crummer.  Annie exercises her theatre chops with unexpectedly brilliant and powerful delivery!  She is perfectly cast as the arch nemesis of the ‘Bohemians’ a group of misplaced yet passionate rock-loving, breathing beings.  The main protagonists in said group (and indeed the entire musical), are portrayed by William Deane as ‘Galileo’ and his love-interest, ‘Scaramouche’ played by Bridie Dixon.

They are supported by other key members of the Bohemians: ‘Brit’ (Caleb Muller),  ‘Buddy’ (David Mackie) and ‘Oz’ (Rebecca Wright), who alongside the Killer Queen’s right hand man ‘Khashoggi’ and of course the star-crossed lovers Galileo and Scaramouche themselves, entertain the audience with such convincing character portrayals, and moving vocal performances from Queens catalogue of hits.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The choreography, lighting and set-design of  We Will Rock You is fantastically polished. The sheer attention to detail, for a production of this magnitude, is no mean feat and the creative team of: Director Emma Carr, Musical Directors, Mark Bradley and Edwin Randall and choreographer, Rebekkah Schoonbeek-Berridge should be applauded for their success!

An ambitious production on every scale, but that is brought together so brilliantly with the energy of it’s entire ensemble, the faultless score from the show’s musicians, and of course Annie Crummer’s seemingly limitless vocal-range.

‘These are the Days of our Lives’ is performed by the entire chorus towards the end of the show, an ominous ode to demise of the legend himself (Freddie Mercury).  Yet within it’s words are a message and a lesson, in living your life whilst also being true to yourself.  A fitting piece of classic Queen to wrap up this musical journey!

 

 

 

 

 

 

*4.5 Stars!

We Will Rock You is currently playing at the Bruce Mason Centre, Takapuna:                                                              20th August – 7th September

 

 

been | Basement’s Spring Launch 2019

Soaking up the culture, on an otherwise quotidian Monday eve, myself and friend were treated to a wonderful night of entertainment and conversation, covering a sneak-peek selection of enticing performances and an invitation to celebrate in Basement’s latest inception, the upcoming Spring Season 2019.

Newly appointed Programming Coordinator – Nisha Madhan,  tickled my creative senses within the first ten minutes, as she provided us with a live run-down of the program as well as an introduction to the contributing artists this season, and the latest additions to the Basement family.  Also discussed were; new developments in store for the renowned theatre company – including a much needed boost in funding, increasing creative opportunities and assisting the development of its artists in residence, as well a discussion of the Basement’s commitments for 2019, these included: The sustainability of artists, promoting an honest and genuine representation of the Aotearoa that we live in today, affordability and diversity, as well as cultural responsibility to name a few …

We were indulged with a powerfully stirring excerpt from the very stoic and passionate poet Carrie Rudzinksi, from her performance piece entitled, ‘How we Survive’ which created with collaborator Olivia Hall, is an expression of feminism and power,

A selection of reviews chosen to share by members of the online publication ‘Pantograph Punch’ – was an offering of critical writing, with one of it’s leading contributors, George Fenwick, pushing the importance of pause and consideration within the structure of a review.  Another excerpt which was superbly articulated by fellow Pantograph writer Rachel, reiterates the purpose of the reviewer; acknowledging and encouraging their role in the creative world.  As a budding writer myself,  I found resonance and motivation within these words spoken.

The love and dedication displayed by all artists and collaborators involved in these prospective productions, was both evident and inspiring.

The night was rounded off with another brilliant extract from a must-see show of the season, entitled ‘First World Problems 2.0’ – an anthology of music inspired by their respective homelands and the current state of our world with it’s (questionably) trivial problems. A most engaging and heartening performance.

A low-key, yet resoundingly successful introduction to Spring Season 19, the performers and their supportive networks.  An impressively diverse range of shows, with much-needed cultural inclusion, which left me and I am certain many others, blessed to be part of, and in eager anticipation for the rest of what this season has to offer!

 

Part of the Basement Family: Mya Morrison and Kimmi Rindel

Enjoying the culture-soaked atmosphere: Luke Courtney and Debbie Teale

Basement Proud: Hamish Russell

been | six degrees of separation

MiNDFOOD SEASON of Six degrees of separation by John Guare, presented by Auckland Theatre Company, exposes the vacuous culture of glitz and greed that so clearly defined the ‘80s. “A story based on real life events depicts the lives of suave, sophisticated and wealthy Manhattan art dealers Flan and Ouisa Kittredge. The Kittredges are all about keeping up appearances but their world of comfort and respectability is turned upside down with the sudden arrival of a charming stranger.”

In Six Degrees of Separation, characters from various backgrounds are thrown together in unexpected situations, and we watch them as they endear themselves to each other, enrage each other, and unravel ultimately to a point of self examination brought on by the charming stranger/con artist.

The result is both humanizing and condemning, leaving us to ponder on what we value, who we care about, and why. Exploring existential ideas, the play delves into a purposeless society with friendships driven by agenda, loneliness and Sisyphean task painted by the never-ending cycle of making enough to sustain their carefully constructed world of privilege.

Notably, the title “Six degrees of separation” plays only a small part in the play, and the theme of inter-connectivity between all people falls in behind more dominant themes of class and race.

Jennifer Ward-Lealand plays Ouisa Kittredge with a commanding stage presence, her nuanced portrayal of a Manhattan socialite with confused sense of self, pretentious and greedy on one side to someone with an inner need for authenticity and meaningful relationships is near perfection.

Andrew Grainger’s Flan Kittredge, is Ouisa’s supportive husband desperately trying to ensure their place in Manhattan society. We feel a tinge of pity for him at the start however as the plot unravels, with his character clinging on to his false persona and his refusal to self examine becomes unnerving to watch. 

Tane Williams-Accra plays Paul the charming stranger posing as a friend of Kittredge’s children, his somewhat awkward beginning is promptly overshadowed by his natural charisma that endears him to his unlikely hosts. He enthrals his unwitting ‘targets’ and the audience alike with his thoughtful ideologies on art, literature, philosophy; a stark contrast to the insecure, bratty and over privileged children of Kittredge as we witness later on in the play.  

One of the key symbols explored in Six Degrees of Separation is a double-sided painting, that Flan Kittredge describes as “one side geometric and sombre. The other side is wild and vivid and adds “We flip it around for variety”  The painting is attributed to Wasily Kandinsky, a celebrated artist whose career spanned the turn of the last century. Ouisa Kittredge explains the nature of the painting and how it is symbolic of the chaotic side of the painting’s dualism. She says: “Chaos, control. Chaos, control. You like, you like?” Making this the question that explains the dual role of the play in its relationship to the art. Though it is about the wealthy and their world it is quite apparent that the notion of chaos and control are very cleverly placed in the art symbolism.

Kandinsky painting holds a place in this production as an example of the dual nature of the play and it’s plot. On one side is the security of the wealthy New York family, while on the other side is the character Paul who is from the streets and possesses an extraordinary intelligence, that is used to con the people that he involves himself with. 

 

Overall a highly entertaining, thought provoking and relevant production. Six Degrees of Separation is showing until 30th August at ASB Waterfront Theatre..

been | Like A River

NZ Theatre company MASSIVE and a quintet of up-and-coming  actors, bring the production ‘Like a River’ to the Basement Theatre this season.

Jo Randerson is the creator of this witty and insightful play, alongside direction from Stef Fink and a talented ingenue cast comprising of: Elsie Polosovai, Francesca Browne, Sherry Zhang, Jasper Putt and Seto Ierome.

Like a River, is a commentary on modern reality, which uses the tried-and-tested templates of such contemporary media and reality television as, ‘My Kitchen Rules’, ‘Love Island’ and ‘This is Your Life’ to name but a few …

Gearing the audience into the game-show style of this play, a large and unmistakable image of a clock is set centre-stage, and as it ticks along it becomes a metaphor for one of the show’s underlying themes; being that of a race against time, and also as a competition of popularity and recognition.  Each individual, expressing themselves and their constitution, in order to make an impression and win the game, albeit with just 60 minutes to spare.

Each actor dons a name tag to identify one another, they also use the formula of using a persons ‘likes and dislikes’ to determine one’s character and convictions.  Comedy is also used to engage the audience and express the ideas of the play, with comical impersonations ranging from the glib and smarmy rantings of Mike Hosking to the infamous Donald Trump and late Robert Muldoon.

Opinions are another strong theme relayed throughout the play; thus questioning the right/wrong circumstances in to which voice them. There are also moments of profound hindsight, in which the characters share their regrets about not speaking up for themselves and for what they innately believed was right.

The play encourages audience participation, as a mode of delivering ‘feedback’, and the feedback in turn, drives the subsequent actions of its participants. (In this case the actors).

Self-awareness in a ‘sea of unknowing’.  Modern Life and technology, the positive and negative influences of social media, and the ever relevant issue of sustainability and the environment, are all topical subjects that this play successfully address and invite the audience to question and form their own opinions upon.

A showcase of fresh talent and idealistic vision – Like A River is now showing at The Basement on these following dates:

~ Wednesday 23rd – Saturday 27th July

PDF 2019 | 5 mins with Ankaramy Fepuleai

South Auckland artist, Ankaramy Fepuleai, creates contemporary work with influences of Hip Hop and Pacific elements. His latest work, LALO, takes you through the process of forgiveness in the Samoan custom ‘Ifoga’ – Humiliation in return of Forgiveness, accept it or not. We chat to him ahead of his shows at this year’s Pacific Dance Festival.

What inspired your performance?
LALO is a piece for my own cultural growth. Being an Australian born Samoan raised in South Auckland, we don’t hear much of the traditional customs and practices that still occur in Samoa today. Through Talanoa with my parents, I found out about Ifoga and their experiences being in the presence of it. Being in New Zealand, these customs are rarely practiced here so I took it upon myself to do more in-depth research about the practice. LALO presents my understanding of ‘Ifoga’ from living amongst the Samoan diaspora.

How many hours a day/s a week do you practice your art?
I am a Third Year Dance Studies student at the University of Auckland, so I am constantly in my practice.

What’s your creative process?
My creative process is heavily based on collaboration with dancers, space, time and location. Everything and anything that is present in the space such as the dancers, my friends who sit on the side during rehearsal, to questioning how dark or bright the room is; all these elements contribute to my creative process.

How would you sell the Pacific Dance Festival to someone who isn’t from the islands?
The Pacific Dance Festival is a platform for our Pasifika people and our stories to be told through the art.

Which events will we find you at this festival? Do you have any recommendations?
Find LALO at this year’s MOANA showcase featured in the Pacific Dance Festival 2019 from June 11th to 12th. Also my good friend Ufitia Sagapolutele has an amazing piece called ‘Trip’ featuring some sick Wahine Toa – Funaki Taulanga, Lyncia Muller, Chas Samoa and Natalia Ioane which is in the Triple Bill show on the 14th June.

What’s coming up for you after this festival?
Will still be in the process of finishing my degree in Dance Studies and I will be heading over to Hong Kong and Macau in July with MANU directed by Xavier Breed for this year’s International Youth Dance Festival 2019.

Ankaramy Fepuleai is the choreographer of LALO, performed in the Moana showcase on Tuesday 11 and Wednesday 12 June at the Mangere Arts Centre, 7pm, as part of the Pacific Dance Festival 2019. Tickets are available from Eventfinda.