been | WEiRdO

WEiRdO – created by Waylon Edwards & William Duignan and directed by Jane Yonge, is a 60 minute production that taps into the ever pressing issue of racism and it’s undeniable presence in the modern, commonplace workplace.

‘WEiRdO’.  The very word itself lends it’s meaning from two separate words: wero, Te Reo for ‘challenge’ and ID, ‘identification’ abbreviated.   Addressing the topic of cultural identity and ‘loss of it’ as a subsequent result of ruthless ambition, it is told in such dry and satirical fashion, that it was often quite uncomfortable with awkward pauses and periods that are utterly confronting,  yet necessary to the direction and theme of play.

As we are presented with a familiar item of office equipment upon entering – the ‘lanyard’, a scene is created; of the droll and banal confines of an inner-city office space, with style of humor reminiscent of 90’s film (aptly titled) ‘Office Space’ and very own early NZ series ‘Gliding On’ …  The lanyard alone becomes somewhat of a center-piece for the rest of the play and also acts as a symbol of power and meteoric rise within the office.

It also acts as a catalyst that prompts a very heated and initially passive-aggressive confrontation between the main protagonist Waylon and his racially ignorant boss/mentor Richard.  This particular scene leads us to the most pivotal moment of the play, where Waylon experiences something of an epiphany; all past injustices that have been pressed upon him and his Tangata Whenua flash before his eyes, while he comes to self-realization of his own moral decline, after trading in on his own people’s struggles for personal gain, as he quickly ascends the corporate ladder.

Waylon Edwards and William Duignan are a creative duo, who have collaborated on numerous productions and whose chemistry and great teamsmanship is evident through both their performances in WEiRdO.  Waylon uses his own background and uniquely talented acting skills, to present a young man who has lost his way and ultimately his own identity,  so convincingly conveyed through his flustered and awkward facial expressions and passionate reaction towards the end.   William, on the other side of the gate, portrays a run-of-the-mill manager, who may not be as intentionally prejudiced as one may think upon initial meeting, but a product of society and the rudimentary structure of a PC, yet culturally insensitive workplace, that we perhaps, may have chosen to believe has ceased to exist.

The underlying message of WEiRdO is pulled together and presented to us, with a powerfully moving and thought-provoking moment of awareness at the end, from which I am sure, did not leave more than a few dry eyes in the audience.

**WEiRdO – is currently playing at the Basement Theatre and runs from Tuesday 17th – Saturday 21st April